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Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

Print Price: $109.99

Format:
Paperback
480 pp.
48 Photos; 99 figures; 11 Tables, 7.5" x 9.25"

ISBN-13:
9780199036752

Copyright Year:
2021

Imprint: OUP Canada


The Stacked Deck

An Introduction to Social Inequality, Second Edition

Jennifer Ball and Lorne Tepperman

The most accessible and engaging exploration of the intersections of inequality in Canada.

The second edition of The Stacked Deck examines how inequalities are experienced, perpetuated, and remedied on individual, organizational, and governmental levels. Uniquely organized around access to key resources-such as income, housing, education, nutritious food, and safety-this text is an accessible and comprehensive introduction to social inequalities.

Readership : Second- and third- year students in social inequality or stratification courses in universities and colleges.

Reviews

  • "Concise, readable, and accessible for students."
    - John Ferguson, University of Guelph

  • "This book introduces students to the sociology of social inequality. It discusses the causes, mechanisms, consequences, and solutions to inequality in Canadian society."
    - Charles Adeyanju, University of Prince Edward Island

  • "[The Stacked Deck] is an excellent introductory text on Social Inequality and related issues. It makes real and immediate the experience of so many Canadians."
    - Dr Francine Tremblay, Concordia University

Preface and Acknowledgements
1. Theories of Social Inequality
Sociology and the Study of Social Inequalities
Sociological Approaches to Inequality
The Sociological Approaches
Sociological Approaches to Neo-liberalism
Social Justice
Intersectionality and Interlocking Disadvantages
Closing Remarks
2. Populations under Discussion
Populations under Discussion
The Peopling of Canadian Society: A Thumbnail History
Colonial History and Current Issues
Low-Income People in Canada
Racialized People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Indigenous Peoples in Canada
LGBTQI2S People in Canada
People in Canada with Disabilities
Closing Remarks
3. Employment Income
Introduction to Survival Capital
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Employment Income
Different Kinds of Capital
Changing Trends in Employment
Immigrants in Canada
Racialized People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Indigenous Peoples in Canada
LGBTQI2S People in Canada
People in Canada with Disabilities
Strategies of Resistance
4. Access to Daycare and Early Childhood Education
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Childcare and Early Education
Ten Facts You Need to Know About Childcare in Canada.
Children
Parents
Indigenous people in Canada
Parents of Children with Special Needs
Consequences of Unequal Access to Daycare and Early Childhood Education
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
5. Access to Formal Education
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Formal Education
The Present-Day Inequalities of Access
Low-income People in Canada
Rural students in Canada
Boys and Young Men
Older Students
People in Canada with Disabilities
Indigenous people in Canada
LGBTQI2S People in Canada
Consequences of Unequal Access to Education
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
6. Access to Housing and Transportation
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Housing and Transportation
Affordable Housing and Homelessness
Emerging Trends in Housing
Low-Income People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Racialized Populations and Ethnic Minorities in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
People in Canada With a Disability
Transportation
Consequences of Unequal Access to Housing or Transportation
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
7. Access to Nutritious Food
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Nutritious Food
Present-day Food Insecurities
Changing Trends in Access to Nutritious Food
Low-Income People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
People in Canada with Disabilities
Consequences of Unequal Access to Nutritious Food
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
8. Access to Good Health and Health Care
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Health Care
The Social Determinants of Health
Changing Trends in Health Care
Low-Income People in Canada
Women in Canada
Men in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
LGBTQI2S People in Canada
People in Canada With Disabilities
Strategies of Resistance
Consequences of Health Inequality
Closing Remarks
9. Access to Legal Representation and Social Services
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Legal Representation and Social Services
Changing Trends in the Demand for Legal and Social Services
Low-Income People in Canada
The Criminal Justice System
Racialized People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Seniors in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
People in Canada with Disabilities
Consequences of Unequal Access to Social Services and Legal Representation
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
10. Access to Safety
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Access to Safety
Three Things to Know About Crime and Victimization
Low-Income People in Canada
Racialized People in Canada
Young People in Canada
Women in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
LGBTQI2S people in Canada
People Who Live in Residential Institutions
Crime as a Consequence of Inequality and the Consequences of Crime
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
11. Respect and the Reproduction of Inequality in Popular Discourse
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Respect and Inequality
Racialized People in Canada
Women in Canada
Immigrants in Canada
Indigenous people in Canada
LGBTQI2S People in Canada
People in Canada with a Disability
Results of Unequal Access to Respect
Strategies of Resistance
Closing Remarks
12. How Canada Compares: A Snapshot of Inequality Around the World
Introduction
Basic Facts About Global Inequality: The Poor
Basic Facts About Global Inequality: The Rich
Why Is This Happening?
Income from Employment
Housing and Transportation
Day-care and Early Childhood Education
Education
Health Care
Equality, Prosperity, and Happiness
Closing Remarks
13. Conclusion
Glossary
References
Index

PowerPoints
For each chapter:
· 30 slides
· Chapter summaries
· All photos, figures, and tables from the book
Test Bank
For each chapter:
· 30+ multiple choice questions
· 20+ true-or-false questions
· 5-10 short answer questions
Plus 6 cumulative essay questions covering the entire book
Student Study Guide
For each chapter:
· Summary review of content
· 5 discussion topics
· 4-5 practice test questions
· Answers to in-text end-of-chapter questions

Jennifer Ball is a professor of sociology and sustainability at Humber College.

Lorne Tepperman is a professor of sociology at the University of Toronto.

Making Sense in the Social Sciences - Margot Northey, Lorne Tepperman and Patrizia Albanese
Understanding Social Inequality - Julie McMullin and Josh Curtis
Social Inequality in Canada - Edward Grabb, Jeffrey G. Reitz and Monica Hwang

Special Features

  • A balance of theory and application, with theory woven throughout as well as detailed descriptions of peoples' lived experiences and strategies of resistance, helps students apply what they learn to their everyday choices.
  • Uniquely focussed on access to key resources, the text illustrates the real consequences of social inequality experienced by specific vulnerable populations every day.
  • Features up-to-date Canadian facts, figures, and examples that are relatable to students while also integrating a global perspective on inequality in a globalized world.
  • A rich, engaging box program expands students' understanding of inequality and encourages them to apply their understanding to real-world scenarios.
  • - Notable Thinkers boxes profile influential and innovative thinkers who have changed the conversation on the themes discussed in each chapter.
  • - In Their Own Words boxes offer first-person accounts of experiences with inequality.
  • - In Focus boxes provide additional information for students on a variety of topics.
  • - Drawing Connections boxes help students understand the relationship between material at hand and material earlier in the text.
  • - Critical Thinking Question boxes challenge students to reflect critically on key concepts and examples.
  • Figures, tables, and photos help students visualize the concepts under discussion.
  • Helpful pedagogical features-including a marginal glossary of key terms; end-of-chapter Test Your Knowledge questions and Questions for Critical Thought; and suggested readings, websites, and videos.
New to this Edition
  • Greater focus on theory with each chapter now opening with an overview of theoretical perspectives-such as functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, and feminism-as they relate to the chapter topic.
  • Expanded coverage of Indigenous Peoples throughout-including both the impacts of colonization and paths to reconciliation-gives students insight into important current issues.
  • More coverage of the history of inequality provides students with important context for understanding contemporary social inequality.
  • The most current data, statistics, and figures, including the 2016 census and subsequent data releases.